Weird War I’s narrative missions

The Weird War I kickstarter has moved into the final three days, and so I thought I would take some time to go over the Narrative Missions System preview that was released a few days ago. After reading it, I remembered that there is a section in the Savage Worlds Deluxe rules I remembered there was a section on Interludes, so since I have never used those rules, I went back a re-read them as well just to see what the differences are. The first difference I saw is that the Narrative Missions System involves everyone, so in that case, I like it better than the Interlude that only involves one player. Each of these systems make use of the cards, though the Interludes only uses the suite and the narrative missions use the suite and the value. Another difference is that while you can’t fail an interlude, you can fail the narrative mission.

This is something that I could see as being useful to do at the beginning of each session before a new mission starts, to represent the mundane missions that the soldiers will do during war-time, and it gives them a chance for an extra benny for the rest of the session, and that could make all the difference. In fact I could see this as being useful in other Savage Worlds settings as a replacement for the interlude system just because it involves the whole group, and it would just take a customizing the what some are all of the card’s suit means. For example in a 50 Fathoms game, I might set it up as follows:

Suit Theme Typical Skills
Spades Travel Boating, Navigation, Notice, Repair
Hearts Social Persuasion, Taunt, Intimidate
Diamonds Physical Climbing, Swimming
Clubs Combat Fighting, Shooting, Spellcasting, Throwing
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Author: Hours without Sleep

I am a professional software tester, who has an interest in programming, computers, role-playing games, history, and reading in general. This is my third attempt at keeping a blog, and I am going to try putting all of my thoughts in one place, and see how it goes.

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